LORRI Images from the Ultima Thule Flyby

(displayed in raw form without special stretching)

Welcome to the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) image site, where NASA and the New Horizons mission are happy to provide these JPEG images - displayed in raw form without special processing - for the public to use and enjoy.

Given Ultima Thule's relatively small size (it's approximately 20 miles across), LORRI didn't actually start to resolve Ultima (that is, see it as more than a point of light) until Dec. 29, when the New Horizons spacecraft closed to within 2 million miles (3 million kilometers). The New Horizons team will start posting LORRI images on Dec. 30, when Ultima should be approximately 1.5 pixels across in the full-resolution ("1x1" mode) pictures.

The resolution will improve each day, so you can watch as Ultima Thule is transformed from a barely resolved object into a new world never seen before. In the images posted on Jan. 1, Ultima is expected to be approximately 3 pixels across, but it will grow to approximately 100 pixels across for the images posted on Jan. 2, and approximately 200 pixels across for the images posted on Jan. 3.

The team will continue posting LORRI images within 24 hours of their receipt on the ground during the first two weeks of January 2019, provided NASA has approved their release. After that, images received at the New Horizons Science Operations Center through each Tuesday at 5 pm ET will be posted on the following Friday. The date/time in the image caption is when the picture was taken by the spacecraft, though receipt of the data on Earth could be many days later.

In addition, the fully validated and calibrated images will be made available at NASA's Planetary Data System within a year after receipt of all images on the ground. All images will be available to the public, but please refer to the official New Horizons Image Use Policy for guidance on their use and attribution.

Learn more about these images »