Resources


Animations

- New Horizons at Jupiter

Six scenes following the Pluto-bound New Horizons spacecraft through the Jupiter system.

New Horizons Approaching Jupiter

Approaching Jupiter

Jupiter Flyby

Jupiter Flyby

New Horizons speeds through the Jupiter system, getting a gravity boost toward Pluto.

Science Instruments Scanning Jupiter

Scanning Jupiter

Jupiter's Aurora

Jupiter's Aurora

Volcano on Io

Volcano on Io

Io in Jupiter's Shadow

Io in Jupiter's shadow

New Horizons Flying Down the Magnetotail

New Horizons flying down the magnetotail

New Horizons Flight Past Jupiter and Io

New Horizons Flight Past Jupiter and Io

- New Horizons Voyage to Pluto

Full Mission: From Earth to Pluto

Full Mission: From Earth to Pluto

Mission Trajectory

Mission Trajectory

Pluto-Charon System

Pluto-Charon System

Pluto Flyby

Pluto Flyby

New Horizons Approaching Pluto

Approaching Pluto

Leaving Pluto/Charon

Leaving Pluto/Charon

Past Pluto to Charon

Past Pluto to Charon

Pluto Occulation

Pluto Occulation

Ralph Instrument

Ralph Instrument

Receiving Data From Earth

Receiving Data From Earth

In Transit to Pluto

In Transit to Pluto

New Horizons Spins to Receive Data

New Horizons Spins to Receive Data

- Pluto System

Pluto/Charon Animation

Pluto Charon Animation

Pluto/Charon Animation

Pluto/Charon Animation

Pluto/Charon Animation

Pluto/Charon Animation

Charon Orbits Pluto

Charon Orbits Pluto

Moving Toward Pluto

Moving Toward Pluto

Viewing Pluto From Charon

Viewing Pluto From Charon

Educational Materials

New Horizons Growth Chart

build spacecraft

Download Your Own New Horizons Growth Chart poster:

Download PDF
(Front)

Download PDF
(Back)

New Horizons Growth Chart Activities (Grades K-5)

New Horizons Growth Chart Activities (Grades K-5)

Orbit and Spin (Grades 3-5)

Orbit and Spin (Grades 3-5)

A whole-body activity that explores the relative sizes, distances, orbit, and spin of the Sun, Earth, and Moon.

Download PDF

Discovering Planet "X" (Grades 3-5)

Discovering Planet X (Grades 3-5)

An activity exploring parallax and then simulating the discovery of Pluto with a Blink Comparator via an online interactive.

Download PDF

Click here to access the Blink Comparator interactive »

Appearances Can Be Deceiving! (Grades 6-8)

Appearances Can Be Deceiving! (Grades 6-8)

Students explore the relationship between angular width, actual size, and distance by using their finger, thumb and fist as a unit of angular measurement in this hands-on activity.

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Earth Calling

Earth Calling

Invisible Collisions

Invisible Collisions

Interactive four-part activity focusing on elastic collisions, flyby basics, and gravity assists.

Download PDF

Click here to view the Interactive Gravity Assist Simulator »

What is a Planet?

what is planet?

Students learn about the characteristics of planets, comets, asteroids, and trans-Neptunian objects through a classification activity.

Download PDF

Earth Matters

earth matters

Classification activities that will lead students from simple sorting of familiar objects to classifying materials into liquids, gases, and solids.

Download PDF

Stellar Illumination

Stellar Illumination

Make Your Own Pluto Globe

Make Your Own Pluto Globe

Who Is King of the Ice Dwarfs?

Who Is King of the Ice Dwarfs?

New Horizons Space Academy

New Horizons Space Academy

The "Space Academy" series takes students behind the scenes of actual space missions and introduces them to engineers and scientists working on some of NASA's most exciting projects.

Visit the Space Academy Site »

Fact Sheets

Technical Summary

Technical Summary

New Horizons Power

New Horizons Power Fact Sheet

Images

- Artist Renderings


New Horizons Approaches Pluto

New Horizons Approaches Pluto

Credit: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute (JHUAPL/SwRI)

Artist’s concept of the New Horizons spacecraft as it approaches Pluto and its largest moon, Charon, in July 2015. The craft's miniature cameras, radio science experiment, ultraviolet and infrared spectrometers and space plasma experiments will characterize the global geology and geomorphology of Pluto and Charon, map their surface compositions and temperatures, and examine Pluto's atmosphere in detail. The spacecraft's most prominent design feature is a nearly 7-foot (2.1-meter) dish antenna, through which it will communicate with Earth from as far as 4.7 billion miles (7.5 billion kilometers) away.

Jupiter Flyby

Jupiter Flyby

Credit: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute (JHUAPL/SwRI)

Although the main mission of New Horizons is to explore the Pluto system and the Kuiper Belt of icy, rocky objects, the spacecraft will first fly by the solar system's largest planet, Jupiter, early 2007 — just a little over a year after launch. In this artist's rendering, New Horizons soars past Jupiter as the volcanic moon Io passes between the spacecraft and planet.

New Horizons spacecraft as it approaches Pluto...

New Horizons spacecraft as it approaches Pluto...

Credit: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute (JHUAPL/SwRI)

Artist's concept of the New Horizons spacecraft as it approaches Pluto and its three moons in summer 2015. The craft's miniature cameras, radio science experiment, ultraviolet and infrared spectrometers and space plasma experiments would characterize the global geology and geomorphology of Pluto and large moon Charon, map their surface compositions and temperatures, and examine Pluto's atmosphere in detail. The spacecraft's most prominent design feature is a nearly 7-foot (2.1-meter) dish antenna, through which it will communicate with Earth from as far as 4.7 billion miles (7.5 billion kilometers) away.

New Horizons at Pluto/Charon

New Horizons at Pluto/Charon

Credit: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute (JHUAPL/SwRI)

Artist's concept of the New Horizons spacecraft during its planned encounter with Pluto and its moon, Charon. The craft's miniature cameras, radio science experiment, ultraviolet and infrared spectrometers and space plasma experiments would characterize the global geology and geomorphology of Pluto and Charon, map their surface compositions and temperatures, and examine Pluto's atmosphere in detail. The spacecraft's most prominent design feature is a nearly 7-foot (2.1-meter) dish antenna, through which it would communicate with Earth from as far as 4.7 billion miles (7.5 billion kilometers) away.

New Horizons at Pluto

New Horizons at Pluto

Credit: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute (JHUAPL/SwRI)

Artist's concept of the New Horizons spacecraft encountering Pluto and its largest moon, Charon, in July 2015. The craft's miniature cameras, radio science experiment, ultraviolet and infrared spectrometers and space plasma experiments will characterize the global geology and geomorphology of Pluto and Charon, map their surface compositions and temperatures, and examine Pluto's atmosphere in detail.

New Horizons over Pluto

New Horizons over Pluto

NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute/Steve Gribben/Alex Parker

Artist's concept of the New Horizons spacecraft encountering Pluto and its largest moon, Charon (foreground) in July 2015. The craft's miniature cameras, radio science experiment, ultraviolet and infrared spectrometers and space plasma experiments will characterize the global geology and geomorphology of Pluto and Charon, map their surface compositions and temperatures, and examine Pluto's atmosphere in detail.

New Horizons: Kuiper Belt Object

New Horizons: Kuiper Belt Object

Credit: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute (JHUAPL/SwRI)

Artist's impression of the New Horizons spacecraft encountering a Kuiper Belt object. The Sun, more than 4.1 billion miles (6.7 billion kilometers) away, shines as a bright star embedded in the glow of the zodiacal dust cloud. Jupiter and Neptune are visible as orange and blue "stars" to the right of the Sun. Although you would not actually see the myriad other objects that make up the Kuiper Belt because they are so far apart, they are shown here to give the impression of an extensive disk of icy worlds beyond Neptune.

Pluto Encounter Panoramic View

Pluto Encounter Panoramic View

Credit: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute (JHUAPL/SwRI)

Artist's concept of the New Horizons spacecraft during its planned encounter with Pluto and its moon, Charon. The craft's miniature cameras, radio science experiment, ultraviolet and infrared spectrometers and space plasma experiments would characterize the global geology and geomorphology of Pluto and Charon, map their surface compositions and temperatures, and examine Pluto's atmosphere in detail. The spacecraft's most prominent design feature is a nearly 7-foot (2.1-meter) dish antenna, through which it would communicate with Earth from as far as 4.7 billion miles (7.5 billion kilometers) away.

Kuiper Belt Object Encounter

Kuiper Belt Object Encounter

Credit: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute (JHUAPL/SwRI)

Artist's impression of the New Horizons spacecraft encountering a Kuiper Belt Object, as part of a potential extended mission after the Pluto flyby. In 2014, using the Hubble Space Telescope, New Horizons science team members discovered three KBOs – all in the range of 20-55 kilometers across, and all with possible flyby dates in late 2018 or in 2019 — a billion miles beyond Pluto. Any extended mission would require NASA approval.

- Event Photos

New Horizons Educator Workshop

The cadre of New Horizons educators converged on APL for a 3-day workshop in August. These K-12 master educators were trained on mission science and engineering goals as well as New Horizons curriculum materials, and will carry out their own regional teacher workshops on the mission. The APL workshop included an opportunity to see the New Horizons spacecraft while it was in testing at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center., and several discussions with key mission scientists and engineers. These teachers will lead the New Horizons National Teacher Workshop at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., during launch week in January.

Women in Space

New Horizons: Jupiter

Photo features the women of the New Horizons Science Team during a tour of Launch Complex 41 -- and a look at the Atlas V launch vehicle -- in November 2005 at Kennedy Space Center.

Summer on Pluto

Pluto Encounter Panoramic View

Undergrads and grad students from across the country took part in hands-on internships during the integration and test phase of the New Horizons and STEREO missions this summer. Participating students were from the NASA Minority University-SPace Interdisciplinary Network (MU-SPIN) and NASA Academy programs. Each student worked side-by-side with a mission team "mentor" for 8 weeks.

Student Dust Counter Team

Pluto Encounter Panoramic View

SDC is an instrument used to measure dust impacts at the New Horizons spacecraft during its entire trajectory and is being built by students at the University of Colorado!

Solar System Educator Training

August 2004 NASA Solar System Educator Training in Salt Lake City, Utah featuring New Horizons' Fran Bagenal (Science Team - University of Colorado) and Alice Bowman (Mission Operations Manager - JHU/APL)

Solar System Educator Training

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Alice Bowman Mission Operations Manager - JHU/APL

Solar System Educator Training

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Fran Bagenal Science Team - University of Colorado

Solar System Educator Training

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L-R Honora Dash, Jim Nations, Bruce Booher, Shirley Greene, Kelly Wardlaw, Cynthia Keeling, Linda Gauthier, Barry Fried

Solar System Educator Training

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Solar System Educators study blocks of ice as part of the "Ice in the Solar System" component of the SSE training in Salt Lake City--NH Educators Jim Nations, Cindy Keeling in forefront and Linda Gautier in the back with another group

Solar System Educator Training

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Kelly Wardlaw and Shirley Greene learn about a "Strange New Planet" as part of SSE training

Solar System Educator Training

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Fran Bagenal Science Team - University of Colorado

Solar System Educator Training

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Alice Bowman Mission Operations Manager - JHU/APL

NSTA - New Horizons

April 2004 National Science Teachers Association Conference -Atlanta, Georgia "Voyage to Pluto, Charon and Beyond

 

Pluto Encounter Panoramic View Pluto Encounter Panoramic View Pluto Encounter Panoramic View Pluto Encounter Panoramic View

- Infographics

Long Road to Pluto

Long Road to Pluto

The Pluto Encounter

The Pluto Encounter

What New Horizons Will Teach Us

What New Horizons Will Teach Us

Pluto Family Yearbook

Pluto Family Yearbook

Pluto Is Really Cold

Pluto Is Really Cold

Pluto’s Known Moons

Pluto's Known Moons

Shipping a Science Lab to Pluto

Shipping a Science Lab to Pluto

Talking to New Horizons

Talking to New Horizons

Kuiper Belt and the Third Zone

Kuiper Belt and the Third Zone

New Horizons Is Fast

New Horizons Is Fast

Pluto/New Horizons by the Numbers

Pluto/New Horizons by the Numbers

It Takes a Team

It Takes a Team

- Launch Photos

Launch Photos

New Horizons launched aboard an Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, on January 19, 2006.

Click here for images of launch and launch preparations from Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral.

- Mission Photos

Kudos Continue for New Horizons Mission Accomplishments

Kudos Continue for New Horizons Mission Accomplishments

Credit: Eric Long, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution

New Horizons mission team members display the National Air and Space Museum's Current Achievement Trophy.

The Women who Power NASA’s New Horizons Mission to Pluto

The Women who Power NASA's New Horizons Mission to Pluto

Credit: Michael Soluri

Women make up approximately 25 percent of the New Horizons flyby team. The female team members were photographed at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory on July 11, 2015, just three days before the spacecraft’s closest approach to Pluto. Kneeling from left to right: Amy Shira Teitel, Cindy Conrad, Sarah Hamilton, Allisa Earle, Leslie Young, Melissa Jones, Katie Bechtold, Becca Sepan, Kelsi Singer, Amanda Zangari, Coralie Jackman, Helen Hart. Standing, from left to right: Fran Bagenal, Ann Harch, Jillian Redfern, Tiffany Finley, Heather Elliot, Nicole Martin, Yanping Guo, Cathy Olkin, Valerie Mallder, Rayna Tedford, Silvia Protopapa, Martha Kusterer, Kim Ennico, Ann Verbiscer, Bonnie Buratti, Sarah Bucior, Veronica Bray, Emma Birath, Carly Howett, Alice Bowman. Not pictured: Priya Dharmavaram, Sarah Flanigan, Debi Rose, Sheila Zurvalec, Adriana Ocampo, Jo-Anne Kierzkowski.

The Women who Power NASA’s New Horizons Mission to Pluto

The Women who Power NASA's New Horizons Mission to Pluto

Credit: Michael Soluri

Alice Bowman, the Mission Operations Manager, at work in the Mission Operations Center. On the job, Bowman is the “MOM” of the MOC.

The Women who Power NASA’s New Horizons Mission to Pluto

The Women who Power NASA's New Horizons Mission to Pluto

Credit: KSC/NASA

Members of the New Horizons team are shown at the launch of the spacecraft, Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida on January 19, 2006. From left to right: Leslie Young, Yanping Guo, Cathy Olkin, Jeanette Thorn, Debi Rose, Ann Harch, Heather Elliott, Fran Bagenal.

Third Anniversary of New Horizons' Launch

Third Anniversary of New Horizons' Launch

Credit: JHUAPL/Southwest Research Institute

Team members took a break from the New Horizons Science Team meeting in January 2009 to mark the third anniversary of New Horizons' launch.

New Horizons Science Team Photo November 2005 Kennedy Space Center with the Atlas V

New Horizons Science Team Photo November 2005

Credit: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

During the November 2005 Science Team Meeting at Kennedy Space Center, team members had an opportunity to see the New Horizons Spacecraft and the Atlas V.

New Horizons Principal Investigator

New Horizons Principal Investigator

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

New Horizons Principal Investigator Alan Stern snaps a photo of the truck that is about to carry NASA's Pluto-bound spacecraft from Goddard Space Flight Center - where it recently completed space-environment tests - to Andrews Air Force Base, Md., on Sept. 23. From Andrews, the spacecraft was flown aboard an Air Force C-17 cargo plane to Kennedy Space Center, Fla., to begin final preparations for its January 2006 launch.

New Horizons Team Photo

New Horizons Team Photo

Credit: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

Several members of the New Horizons team gathered in November 2004 for this team photo at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Maryland, where the New Horizons spacecraft is being built. Principal Investigator Alan Stern, director of the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Space Studies Department, leads a mission team that includes APL, Ball Aerospace Corporation, the Boeing Company, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Stanford University, KinetX, Inc., Lockheed Martin Corporation, University of Colorado, the U.S. Department of Energy, and a number of other firms, NASA centers and university partners.

Press Briefing

Press Briefing 1 Press Briefing 2

Credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Representatives of NASA's New Horizons Mission to Pluto discuss the mission during a press briefing on the Draft Environmental Impact Statement at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. From left are Orlando Figueroa, deputy associate administrator for Programs, Science Mission Directorate; Earl Wahlquist, associate director for Space and Defense Power Systems, Department of Energy, in Germantown, Md.; Kurt Lindstrom, New Horizons program executive, with NASA; Hal Weaver, New Horizons project scientist, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md.; and Glen Fountain, New Horizons project manager, also with Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. The spacecraft will explore Pluto, its moon Charon, and possibly one or more objects within the Kuiper Belt. New Horizons is planned for launch during a window from Jan. 11 to Feb. 14, 2006, on an Atlas V 551 booster with a Star 48B third stage. It will proceed to a Jupiter gravity assist between Feb. 25 and March 2, 2007, if launched during the first 23 days of the launch window. (If it is launched during the last 12 days of the launch window it will have a direct-to-Pluto trajectory. There is a backup launch opportunity in February 2007.)

- Science Photos

- Spacecraft Images

 View images from Kennedy Space Center

Model Features

Third Anniversary of New Horizons' Launch

Credit: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

Mission Project Scientist Hal Weaver (right) points out features on the New Horizons spacecraft model to curious Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory co-workers, just after the one-half-scale model was installed in the lobby of APL’s newest building (Building 200) on Dec. 22, 2011. APL built and operates the New Horizons spacecraft from its campus in Laurel, Maryland.

Model Spacecraft Pair

New Horizons Science Team Photo November 2005

Credit: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

Models of the Pluto-bound New Horizons (left) and the Mercury-orbiting MESSENGER spacecraft adorn the lobby of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory’s newest building (Building 200). APL built and operates both spacecraft from its campus in Laurel, Maryland. The one-half-scale New Horizons model, also built at APL, was installed on Dec. 22, 2011.

APL Model

New Horizons Principal Investigator

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

A half-scale model of the New Horizons spacecraft hangs in the lobby of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory’s newest building (Building 200), which houses most of the Lab’s Space Department staff. APL built and operates the New Horizons spacecraft from its campus in Laurel, Maryland. The model, also built at APL, was installed on Dec. 22, 2011.

NASM Model

New Horizons Team Photo

Credit: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

A life-size model of the New Horizons spacecraft – provided by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, where the real New Horizons was designed and built – is on display at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center near Washington Dulles International Airport in Northern Virginia. The New Horizons display is at the far end of the James McDonnell Space Hangar, behind the space shuttle Enterprise.

Read the full story of the New Horizons model

SWAP Installation

New Horizons Team Photo

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

Mike Lynch of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory and Benjamin Rodriguez of the Southwest Research Institute re-install the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument on NASA's New Horizons spacecraft Oct. 5 at Kennedy Space Center, Fla. SWAP, one of seven instruments on the Pluto-bound New Horizons probe, had been removed for previously planned maintenance and installation of new detectors. Visible above SWAP is the Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) instrument; to the right are the telescopic Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) and, with protective red covers, the spacecraft's star-tracking navigation cameras.

Launch is scheduled during a 35-day window that opens on January 11, 2006.

PEPSSI Operations

New Horizons Team Photo

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

Mike Lynch, Carlos Castillo and Jim Hutcheson of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory apply thermally insulating Kapton tape between the Pluto-bound New Horizons spacecraft and the Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) instrument during pre-launch operations at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., on Oct 5. Below PEPSSI is the slot for the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument, which was re-installed following the PEPSSI operations, and atop the spacecraft is the nearly 7-foot diameter dish antenna New Horizons will use to send data back from the distant planet.

Launch is scheduled during a 35-day window that opens on January 11, 2006.

Loading Into Cargo Plane

New Horizons Team Photo

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

Packed safely in a custom-built, pressurized shipping container, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft is loaded into a C-17 cargo plane at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., for the flight to Kennedy Space Center, Fla., on Sept. 23. The spacecraft arrived at KSC early the next morning, and is undergoing final preparations for its scheduled January 2006 launch toward Pluto and the Kuiper Belt.

Unloading Spacecraft

New Horizons Team Photo

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

The Air Force C-17 cargo plane carrying the New Horizons spacecraft awaits unloading at the Shuttle Landing Facility, Kennedy Space Center , Fla. , early on Sept. 24. The spacecraft and associated equipment had been transported from Maryland , where the probe was built and tested for its scheduled January 2006 launch and mission to Pluto.

Prepare to Unload

New Horizons Team Photo

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

Mission team members and ground crew prepare to unload the shipping "can" containing the New Horizons spacecraft at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., shortly after the Air Force C-17 cargo plane that carried the probe touched down at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Sept. 24. The custom-made, pressurized controlled shipping container is about 10 feet tall and 10 feet wide.

Spacecraft Packed for Shipment

New Horizons Team Photo

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

Packed safely in a pressurized shipping container, the New Horizons spacecraft is loaded onto a flatbed truck at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt , Md. , on Sept. 23 for the trip to Andrews Air Force Base, where it was loaded onto a C-17 cargo plane and flown to Kennedy Space Center , Fla. The Pluto-bound probe recently completed three months of space-environment tests at Goddard; before then it was tested at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Md., where it was designed and built. New Horizons arrived at Kennedy Space Center in the early hours of Sept. 24 and is now being prepared for its scheduled January 2006 launch.

Antenna Move

New Horizons Team Photo

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute (NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI)

Team members at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, MD, move the high-gain antenna assembly toward the New Horizons spacecraft for installation on April 13, 2005. The spacecraft's most prominent design feature, the assembly includes high-, medium-, and low-gain antennas. The high-gain antenna consists of a 2.1-meter (nearly 7-foot) reflector dish mounted close to the spacecraft and a subreflector on the back side of the medium-gain reflector.

Visible on the back of the spacecraft are (from left) the Solar Wind at Pluto (SWAP), Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) and LOng Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) instruments, as well as the star-tracking navigation cameras (with protective red caps).

According to mission plans, New Horizons would be about 5 billion kilometers (3.1 billion miles) from Earth when it reaches Pluto in summer 2015. This stacked design provides a clear field of view for the low-gain antenna, while providing structural support for the high- and medium-gain reflector antennas. The antenna is also a key component of the mission's Radio Science Experiment - called REX - which will help scientists understand the structure of Pluto's atmosphere by looking at how radio signals change as they're sent from Earth and move through Pluto's atmosphere.

Attaching the Antenna 2

New Horizons Team Photo

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute (NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI)

Team members at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, MD, attach the high-gain antenna assembly to the New Horizons spacecraft on April 13, 2005. The spacecraft's most prominent design feature, the assembly includes high-, medium-, and low-gain antennas. The high-gain antenna consists of a 2.1-meter (nearly 7-foot) reflector dish mounted close to the spacecraft and a subreflector on the back side of the medium-gain reflector.

According to mission plans, New Horizons would be about 5 billion kilometers (3.1 billion miles) from Earth when it reaches Pluto in summer 2015. This stacked design provides a clear field of view for the low-gain antenna, while providing structural support for the high- and medium-gain reflector antennas. The antenna is also a key component of the mission's Radio Science Experiment - called REX - which will help scientists understand the structure of Pluto's atmosphere by looking at how radio signals change as they're sent from Earth and move through Pluto's atmosphere.

Attaching the Antenna 1

New Horizons Team Photo

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute (NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI)

Team members at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, MD, attach the high-gain antenna assembly to the New Horizons spacecraft on April 13, 2005. The spacecraft's most prominent design feature, the assembly includes high-, medium-, and low-gain antennas. The high-gain antenna consists of a 2.1-meter (nearly 7-foot) reflector dish mounted close to the spacecraft and a subreflector on the back side of the medium-gain reflector.

Also visible on the left side of the spacecraft below the dish are (clockwise, from top) the Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI), LOng Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) and Solar Wind at Pluto (SWAP) instruments.

According to mission plans, New Horizons would be about 5 billion kilometers (3.1 billion miles) from Earth when it reaches Pluto in summer 2015. This stacked design provides a clear field of view for the low-gain antenna, while providing structural support for the high- and medium-gain reflector antennas. The antenna is also a key component of the mission's Radio Science Experiment - called REX - which will help scientists understand the structure of Pluto's atmosphere by looking at how radio signals change as they're sent from Earth and move through Pluto's atmosphere.

Antenna Fit Check 2

New Horizons Team Photo

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute (NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI)

New Horizons team members get a good look under the spacecraft during a "fit check" of the 2.1-meter (nearly 7-foot) dish antenna on Feb. 1, 2005, at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md. Visible on the spacecraft body are its star-tracking cameras (with protective red covers) and, at left, the Solar Wind at Pluto (SWAP) and Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) instruments.

Antenna Fit Check 1

New Horizons Team Photo

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute (NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI)

The New Horizons spacecraft team conducts a "fit check" of the 2.1-meter (nearly 7-foot) dish antenna Feb. 1, 2005, at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md. Also visible on the spacecraft body are its star-tracking cameras (with protective red covers), the Alice ultraviolet imaging spectrometer (at right) and the Solar Wind at Pluto (SWAP) and Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) instruments (at left). Launch of New Horizons, the first mission to Pluto and the Kuiper Belt, is planned for January 2006.

System Check

New Horizons Team Photo

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute (NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI)

A technician at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory checks the electronics on NASA's New Horizons spacecraft. Launch of the Pluto flyby mission is currently planned for January 2006.

Alice Installation

New Horizons Team Photo

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute (NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI)

Technicians at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland, install the Alice ultraviolet imaging spectrometer on NASA's New Horizons spacecraft. Alice is one of seven science instruments designed for the Pluto flyby mission, which is planned for launch in January 2006.

LORRI Installation

New Horizons Team Photo

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute (NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI)

Technicians at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland, install the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on NASA's New Horizons spacecraft. The telescopic camera is one of seven science instruments designed for the Pluto flyby mission, which is planned for launch in January 2006.

- Image Use Policy

Using New Horizons Images and Video

New Horizons images and video on this website are generally available for non-commercial educational and public information purposes, so long as their use does not convey NASA's, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory's or Southwest Research Institute's implicit or explicit endorsement of any goods or services. No fee or written permission is required for their use, but please credit images to NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute (unless otherwise noted in the image caption).

New Horizons is a NASA mission and adheres to the space agency's guidelines for image use and reproduction. Visit the NASA website "Using NASA Imagery and Linking to NASA Web Sites" for more information, or contact the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory Public Affairs Office at (240) 228-5020 or web-NewHorizonsPublicAffairs-contact@jhuapl.edu.

Linking to the New Horizons website is permitted, provided the link is strictly for information and does not convey implicit or explicit endorsement of any goods or services by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Southwest Research Institute, or NASA.

Mission Guide

Mission Guide

Mission Guide

  • General Release
  • Quick Facts
  • Pluto at a Glance
  • The Science of New Horizons
  • NASA's New Frontiers Progra
  • The Spacecraft
  • Mission Overview
  • New Horizons Nuclear Safety
  • Program/Project Management

Download PDF

Models

Make Your Own Pluto Globe (All Ages)

Assemble your own globe of Pluto using images from the Hubble Space Telescope—the best images of Pluto we have had until New Horizons!

Make a Model of the Pluto/Charon System (All Ages)

Pluto and Charon are a binary system. Build your own model of a binary system and see what makes it so unique! With adult help, children of any age will enjoy this activity.

Build Your Own New Horizons Spacecraft (Ages 10+)

Best suited for ages 10+, build a scale model of the New Horizons spacecraft!

Spacecraft Model Files

Spacecraft Model Files

Build your own 3D New Horizons spacecraft model.

Below is a zipped file of .stl-formatted printable models including instructions for printing and assembly.

We understand that 3D printing often involves trial and error. You may make adjustments or changes when printing these models.

Model Design Diagram

Mission Overview Fact Sheet

New Horizons Online

Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/new.horizons1

Twitter
https://twitter.com/NASAnewhorizons

YouTube
https://www.youtube.com/user/NASANewHorizons

Google+
https://plus.google.com/112289660627388606639/about

Site Feedback
web-NewHorizonsWebmaster-contact@jhuapl.edu

PI Alan Stern’s New Horizons Twitter Feed
https://twitter.com/NewHorizons2015

Pluto Picture of the Day
http://www.boulder.swri.edu/ppod/

Countdown to the Pluto Encounter!
http://seeplutonow.com/

Musical tribute to Clyde Tombaugh and the New Horizons mission:
http://www.eliasfey.com/newhorizons.html

NASA New Horizons Site
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/newhorizons/main/index.html

New Horizons Science Team site (Southwest Research Institute)
http://www.boulder.swri.edu/pkb/

Great information about Pluto (Southwest Research Institute)
http://www.boulder.swri.edu/~buie/pluto/pluto.html

Welcome to the Planets (JPL)
http://pds.jpl.nasa.gov/planets/welcome/pluto.htm

NASA Solar System Exploration: Pluto
http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/profile.cfm?Object=Pluto

The Space Place
http://spaceplace.jpl.nasa.gov/pluto

Names of the planets in other languages:
http://www.nineplanets.org/days.html

Lowell Observatory, where Clyde Tombaugh discovered Pluto
http://www.lowell.edu/

Clyde Tombaugh site
http://www.klx.com/clyde/index.html

NASA Deep Space Network
http://deepspace.jpl.nasa.gov/dsn/

New Horizons Student Dust Counter (University of Colorado)
http://lasp.colorado.edu/sdc/

Posters

Video

- Archive of Live Broadcasts

Countdown to Pluto

Countdown to Pluto: July 14, 2015, Phone Home

New Horizons Webcast: July 14, 2015

Countdown to Pluto: July 14, 2015

New Horizons Webcast: July 14, 2015

Countdown to Pluto: July 13, 2015

New Horizons Webcast: July 13, 2015

Countdown to Pluto: July 12, 2015

New Horizons Webcast: July 12, 2015

Countdown to Pluto: July 11, 2015

New Horizons Webcast: July 11, 2015

Countdown to Pluto: July 10, 2015

New Horizons Webcast: July 10, 2015

Countdown to Pluto: July 9, 2015

New Horizons Webcast: July 9, 2015

Countdown to Pluto: July 8, 2015

New Horizons Webcast: July 8, 2015

Countdown to Pluto: June 30, 2015

New Horizons Webcast: June 30, 2015

Countdown to Pluto: June 23, 2015

New Horizons Webcast: June 23, 2015

Countdown to Pluto: June 16, 2015

New Horizons Webcast: June 16, 2015

Countdown to Pluto: June 9, 2015

New Horizons Webcast: June 9, 2015

Pluto in a Minute

July 21, 2015: Dr. Brian May Shows Us How To Really See Pluto

July 21, 2015

July 20, 2015: How LORRI Takes Such Phenomenal Pictures

July 20, 2015

July 19, 2015: What Is New Horizons Going to Do After Pluto?

July 19, 2015

July 18, 2015: New Horizons Says It's Even Colder on Pluto

July 18, 2015

July 17, 2015: Ice Mountains Were a Real Surprise for New Horizons

July 17, 2015

July 16, 2015: How Did Pluto Accelerate New Horizons?

July 16, 2015

July 15, 2015: How Did New Horizons Phone Home?

July 15, 2015

July 14, 2015: 50 Years of Imaging

July 15, 2015

July 13, 2015: New Horizons is Going Dark for Flyby

July 13, 2015

July 12, 2015: Meet New Horizons' Science Payload

July 12, 2015

July 11, 2015: #PlutoTime

July 10, 2015

July 10, 2015: Eyes on Pluto

July 10, 2015

July 9, 2015: Why A Flyby?

July 9, 2015

July 8, 2015: How Similar are Pluto and Charon to the Earth and the Moon?

July 8, 2015

July 7, 2015: How Did Pluto Get So Far Away?

July 7, 2015

July 4, 2015: Five Things You Didn't Know About Pluto's Atmosphere​

July 4, 2015

July 3, 2015: How New Horizons Will See Pluto Without Knowing Where It Is

July 3, 2015

July 2, 2015: The Other Red Planet

July 2, 2015

July 1, 2015: Pluto is Two-faced!

July 1, 2015

June 30, 2015: There's Methane on Pluto!

June 30, 2015

NASA EDGE

New Horizons

NASA EDGE New Horizons

- Data Movies

Pluto System

New Horizons' Best Close-Up of Pluto's Surface

05/27/2016

New Horizons' Best Close-Up of Pluto's Surface

Spinning Moons

11/09/2015

Spinning Moons

Flyover Sputnik Planum

09/21/2015

Flyover Sputnik Planum

Mountains on Pluto

07/15/2015

Mountains on Pluto

Pluto and Charon Surfaces in Living Color

07/03/2015

Pluto and Charon Surfaces in Living Color

The ‘Other’ Red Planet

07/03/2015

The 'Other' Red Planet

Features on Pluto and Charon

06/11/2015

Features on Pluto and Charon

Pluto and Charon in Color: Pluto-Centric View

06/11/2015

Pluto and Charon in Color: Pluto-Centric View

Pluto and Charon in Color: Barycentric View

06/11/2015

Pluto and Charon in Color: Barycentric View

Variations in Pluto's Surface During Rotation

06/11/2015

Variations in Pluto's Surface During Rotation

Pluto's Faintest Known Moons

05/12/2015

New Horizons Spots Pluto’s Faintest Known Moons

Pluto-centric Movie

04/29/2015

Pluto-centric

Bary-centric Movie

04/29/2015

Bary-centric

New Horizons Spots Small Moons Orbiting Pluto

02/18/2015

New Horizons Spots Small Moons Orbiting Pluto

A Long Distance Look from LORRI

01/27/2015

A Long Distance Look from LORRI

A Moon over Pluto

07/24/2014

A Moon over Pluto

A Moon over Pluto (Close up)

07/24/2014

A Moon over Pluto (Close up)

New Horizons Sees Pluto

09/24/2006

New Horizons Sees Pluto

New Horizons at Jupiter

Ring Erosion

Ring Erosion

Arc Discovery

Arc Discovery

Ammonia Clouds on Jupiter

Pluto/Charon Orbit Sun

Tvashtar in Motion

Tvashtar in Motion

Shepherd Moons

Shepherd Moons

Tvashtar Movie

Tvashtar Movie

A 'Moving' Jupiter Global Map

A Moving Jupiter Global Map

A Day on Jupiter

A Day on Jupiter

Jupiter Rotation

Jupiter Rotation

- Events

Flagship Plutopalooza Event Videos

Cal Academy

04/25/2015

Plutopalooza Event

Explorers Club

05/13/2015

Plutopalooza Event

American Museum of Natural History

05/14/2015

Plutopalooza Event

Denver Museum of Nature and Science

06/10/2015

Plutopalooza Event

- Interviews

Spacewalking Videos

Person-on-the-street interviews from Baltimore, Maryland, in 2006.

Spacewalking: Is Pluto a Planet?

Spacewalking Videos


Team Member Interviews

How did members of the New Horizons team view the mission before it was even approved for launch? Watch segments of these interviews from early 2005.

What is the scientific urgency to get to Pluto now?

Alan Stern<

Alan Stern, Principal Investigator

What will Pluto tell us about the solar system?

Alan Stern<

Alan Stern, Principal Investigator

What is the significance of the name New Horizons?

Alan Stern<

Alan Stern, Principal Investigator

What do we want to learn about the Kuiper Belt?

Alan Stern<

Alan Stern, Principal Investigator

Describe the chance to explore Pluto.

Alan Stern<

Alan Stern, Principal Investigator

Why should we study Pluto and the Kuiper Belt?

Leslie Young

Leslie Young, Deputy Project Scientist

What is a Kuiper Belt Object?

Leslie Young

Leslie Young, Deputy Project Scientist

What makes Pluto different from other planets in our solar system?

Leslie Young

Leslie Young, Deputy Project Scientist

What do we hope to learn from this mission?

Leslie Young

Leslie Young, Deputy Project Scientist

How does a spacecraft get to Pluto?

Robert Farquhar

Robert Farquhar, Mission Director

What does the team want to study at Pluto?

Robert Farquhar

Robert Farquhar, Mission Director

How will the spacecraft communicate with Earth?

Andrew Cheng

Andrew Cheng, Science Team Member

Why explore Pluto?

Andrew Cheng

Andrew Cheng, Science Team Member

Why is it important to send a spacecraft to Pluto now?

Andrew Cheng

Andrew Cheng, Science Team Member

How is Pluto different than its moon Charon?

Andrew Cheng

Andrew Cheng, Science Team Member

Describe the excitement of exploring Pluto.

Andrew Cheng

Andrew Cheng, Science Team Member

- Mission Videos

Scott Kelly Recognizes Pluto Flyby from the Space Station

07/14/2015

Scott Kelly Recognizes Pluto Flyby from the Space Station

The Wait

 

The Wait

The Year of Pluto

 

The Year of Pluto

New Horizons Model Dedication

Video played at the dedication of the New Horizons model at the National Air and Space Museum's Udvar-Hazy Center on Oct. 17, 2008.

Pluto/Charon Orbit Sun

The Great Planet Debate
Science as Process - A Scientific Conference and Educator Workshop

August 14-16, 2008 at the The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory Kossiakoff Center, Laurel, MD

The Great Planet Debate

Scientists Get First Look at Io

Andy Cheng and Hal Weaver at APL discuss the first look at the LORRI images on Monday, February 26, 2007.

Mission Scientists, Hal Weaver and Andy Cheng February 26, 2007

Scientists Get First Look at Io

Andy Cheng and Hal Weaver at APL discuss the first look at the LORRI images on Monday, February 26, 2007 and are joined by team member John Spencer from Boulder, CO, on the phone to share the news.

Mission Scientists, Hal Weaver, Andy Cheng, and John Spencer February 26, 2007

Launch Video

New Horizons lifts off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., on January 19, 2006.

Launch Video

Space Academy - New Horizons Mission to Pluto

March 10, 2005 - Watch as 100 Maryland middle schoolers learn about the "first mission to the last planet" just months before New Horizons embarks on its historic journey.

New Horizons Mission to Pluto

Comcast Local Edition

Then-Deputy Mission Systems Engineer Jim Stratton describes the first mission to Pluto in March 2005.

Space Academy: New Horizons Mission

Student Dust Counter - Destination Pluto and Beyond

Go inside the effort to build the New Horizons Student Dust Counter – the first student-built instrument on a NASA planetary mission.

Destination Pluto and Beyond

- Movie Trailers

The Year of Pluto Trailer

The New Horizons mission will help us understand worlds at the edge of our solar system by making the first reconnaissance of the planet Pluto and by venturing deeper into the distant, mysterious Kuiper Belt – a relic of solar system formation.

The Year of Pluto Trailer

New Horizons Going for Planetary Gold

At Pluto, New Horizons Going for Planetary Science Gold

Coming Soon: New Horizons Meets Pluto

Coming soon to a solar system near you: New Horizons Meets Pluto!

2010: Halfway to Pluto
The Adventure Continues

A New Adventure Begins

A New Adventure Begins

A New Adventure Begins

- Passport to Pluto

Passport to Pluto

Passport to Pluto

The story of New Horizons from idea to launch pad.

Passport to Pluto and Beyond

Passport to Pluto and Beyond

The New Horizons story continues through the Jupiter encounter.

- Podcasts

Clyde Tombaugh: Discover of Pluto

 

Clyde Tombaugh: Discover of Pluto

Walking to Pluto

NASA's Jim Green Walks to Pluto

Joe Peterson

Joe Peterson

Getting to Pluto is a Team Sport

Getting to Pluto is a Team Sport

Taking Pictures of Pluto

Mark Holdridge

Clyde Tombaugh's Legacy of Discovery

Tombaugh family members reflect on New Horizons mission and the exploration of the planet their father discovered.

Tombaugh Birthday

The Real PlutoPhiles

Alan Stern

AlanSternPlutophile

Alex Parker

AlexParkerPlutophile

Amanda Gulbis

AmandaGulbisPlutophile

Bill McKinnon

BillMcKinnonPlutophile

Dale Cruikshank

DaleCruikshankPlutophile

Fran Bagenal

FranBagenalPlutophile

James Green

JamesGreenPlutophile

Jamey Szalay

JameySzalayPlutophile

Leslie Young

LeslieYoungPlutophile

Marc Buie

MarcBuiePlutophile

Pluto Encounter Rehearsal

Part I: The Encounter Begins

The calendar said July 2013, but for the New Horizons team practicing the Pluto encounter, it was July 2015.

Part I: The Encounter Begins

Part II: Passing Pluto

The mission team guides spacecraft activity and examines simulated data in the same way they'll handle the "real thing" when Pluto slowly reveals its secrets to New Horizons in July 2015.

Part II: Passing Pluto

The KBO Search: Hunting Ancient Ice Worlds

On the Space Frontier

The New Horizons team searches for ancient ice worlds at the edge of the solar system

On the Space Frontier

The Observations Begin

Team members coordinate their KBO search between telescopes in Hawaii and Chile

The Observations Begin

Doing Astronomy on Top of the World

Mauna Kea offers some of the best views of space from Earth, but the living (and working) ain't always easy.

Doing Astronomy on Top of the World

Crowd-Sourcing the Kuiper Belt

For help in finding a potential KBO flyby target, New Horizons scientists took to the Web.

Crowd-Sourcing the Kuiper Belt


NASA Mission Update Video

NASA Mission Update: New Horizons

NASA Mission Update: New Horizons


New Horizons: To Pluto & Beyond

Podcast #1: From Earth to Jupiter

Meet the team preparing New Horizons for its Jupiter flyby.

From Earth to Jupiter

Podcast #2: The Jupiter Flyby

Flying Past Jupiter boosts New Horizons speed and shaves years off the trip to Pluto.

The Jupiter Flyby

Podcast #3: New Horizons Encounter with Jupiter: Science Never Sleeps

The Jupiter gravity assist gives New Horizons a chance to test its science instruments - and make discoveries along the way.

New Horizons Encounter with Jupiter: Science Never Sleeps

Podcast #4: Jupiter Closest Approach

New Horizons braves the tough radiation environment at Jupiter and gives the team new views of the solar system's largest planet.

Jupiter Closest Approach

Podcast #5: The Hibernation Express

A successful flyby behind it and a long cruise ahead, the team places New Horizons in hibernation.

The Hibernation Express

NASA Direct: New Horizons Features

Next Stop: Pluto

Next Stop: Pluto

Planning a mission to the far reaches of the solar system is no easy task.

Designed Specially for Pluto:

Designed Specially for Pluto

New Horizons sports science instruments that will send us first-of-a-kind images.



What is Podcasting?

A Podcast is an easy way to automatically download audio and video files to your computer or iPod. Use a free application to subscribe to the Podcast feed. This application will check site you subscribe to regularly and starts a download whenever it finds something new. Once you have Podcasting setup, the next time you synch your MP3 device, any new audio or video files added since your last synch will automatically be downloaded.

What do I need to view these video Podcasts?

Besides a computer and a broadband internet connection (DXL, cable, etc.) you will need free podcasting software capable of playing videos (iTunes,etc.) or a portable video-capable MP3 player (iPod, etc.).

How can I subscribe to this Podcast?

Install the required podcast software on your computer. The most popular video-capable software is iTunes.

Subscribe to a Podcast Feed by following directions provided with the application. Usually this requires little more than pasting your desired Podcast URL into the application.

If asked to enter a URL to the feed, enter: http://feeds2.feedburner.com/PlutoAndBeyondPodcast

Example: How to add this Podcast to iTunes

Simply 'drag and drop' Podcast icon above in to your iTunes Podcasts folder.
*Drag and Drop: Click the link, hold the mouse button down and move the mouse, dragging the link.

- Press Conferences

Media Briefing

NASA's New Horizons Team Reveals New Scientific Findings on Pluto. July 24, 2015

NASA's New Horizons Team Reveals New Scientific Findings on Pluto

New Horizons: Capturing the Heart of Pluto

NASA officials and team members provide an update and share the latest developments on the spacecraft. July 17, 2015

NASA's New Horizons: Seeing Pluto Like Never Before

Media Briefing

Mission team members discuss the initial data returned from the Pluto Flyby. July 15, 2015

NASA's New Horizons: Seeing Pluto Like Never Before

Pluto Flyby Media Briefing

Mission team members discuss the preparations, expectations, and plans for the Pluto Flyby. July 14, 2015

NASA's New Horizons: Seeing Pluto Like Never Before

NASA's New Horizons: Seeing Pluto Like Never Before

Mission team members discuss the science of exploring Pluto. April 14, 2015

NASA's New Horizons: Seeing Pluto Like Never Before

NASA's New Horizons: Getting to Pluto

Mission team members preview the spacecraft's encounter at Pluto. April 14, 2015

NASA's New Horizons: Getting to Pluto

New Horizons on Pluto's Doorstep

Mission team previews the Pluto encounter at the American Geophysical Union 2014 Fall Meeting. Dec. 18, 2014

New Horizons on Pluto's Doorstep

New Horizons: Continuing Voyager’s Legacy of Exploration

In August 2014, New Horizons crossed Neptune's orbit on the 25th anniversary of Voyager 2's encounter with the planet.

Aug. 25, 2014

Press Conference

New Horizons and Voyager: Connections and Recollections

New Horizons scientists recall their work during the Voyager Neptune encounter.

Aug. 25, 2014

Press Conference

Jupiter Science Media Briefing

The New Horizons team covers Jupiter in this NASA Science Update from May 2007.

Press Conference