Mission Photos


Kudos Continue for New Horizons Mission Accomplishments

Kudos Continue for New Horizons Mission Accomplishments

Credit: Eric Long, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution

New Horizons mission team members display the National Air and Space Museum's Current Achievement Trophy.

The Women who Power NASA’s New Horizons Mission to Pluto

The Women who Power NASA's New Horizons Mission to Pluto

Credit: Michael Soluri

Women make up approximately 25 percent of the New Horizons flyby team. The female team members were photographed at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory on July 11, 2015, just three days before the spacecraft’s closest approach to Pluto. Kneeling from left to right: Amy Shira Teitel, Cindy Conrad, Sarah Hamilton, Allisa Earle, Leslie Young, Melissa Jones, Katie Bechtold, Becca Sepan, Kelsi Singer, Amanda Zangari, Coralie Jackman, Helen Hart. Standing, from left to right: Fran Bagenal, Ann Harch, Jillian Redfern, Tiffany Finley, Heather Elliot, Nicole Martin, Yanping Guo, Cathy Olkin, Valerie Mallder, Rayna Tedford, Silvia Protopapa, Martha Kusterer, Kim Ennico, Ann Verbiscer, Bonnie Buratti, Sarah Bucior, Veronica Bray, Emma Birath, Carly Howett, Alice Bowman. Not pictured: Priya Dharmavaram, Sarah Flanigan, Debi Rose, Sheila Zurvalec, Adriana Ocampo, Jo-Anne Kierzkowski.

The Women who Power NASA’s New Horizons Mission to Pluto

The Women who Power NASA's New Horizons Mission to Pluto

Credit: Michael Soluri

Alice Bowman, the Mission Operations Manager, at work in the Mission Operations Center. On the job, Bowman is the “MOM” of the MOC.

The Women who Power NASA’s New Horizons Mission to Pluto

The Women who Power NASA's New Horizons Mission to Pluto

Credit: KSC/NASA

Members of the New Horizons team are shown at the launch of the spacecraft, Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida on January 19, 2006. From left to right: Leslie Young, Yanping Guo, Cathy Olkin, Jeanette Thorn, Debi Rose, Ann Harch, Heather Elliott, Fran Bagenal.

Third Anniversary of New Horizons' Launch

Third Anniversary of New Horizons' Launch

Credit: JHUAPL/Southwest Research Institute

Team members took a break from the New Horizons Science Team meeting in January 2009 to mark the third anniversary of New Horizons' launch.

New Horizons Science Team Photo November 2005 Kennedy Space Center with the Atlas V

New Horizons Science Team Photo November 2005

Credit: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

During the November 2005 Science Team Meeting at Kennedy Space Center, team members had an opportunity to see the New Horizons Spacecraft and the Atlas V.

New Horizons Principal Investigator

New Horizons Principal Investigator

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

New Horizons Principal Investigator Alan Stern snaps a photo of the truck that is about to carry NASA's Pluto-bound spacecraft from Goddard Space Flight Center - where it recently completed space-environment tests - to Andrews Air Force Base, Md., on Sept. 23. From Andrews, the spacecraft was flown aboard an Air Force C-17 cargo plane to Kennedy Space Center, Fla., to begin final preparations for its January 2006 launch.

New Horizons Team Photo

New Horizons Team Photo

Credit: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

Several members of the New Horizons team gathered in November 2004 for this team photo at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Maryland, where the New Horizons spacecraft is being built. Principal Investigator Alan Stern, director of the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Space Studies Department, leads a mission team that includes APL, Ball Aerospace Corporation, the Boeing Company, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Stanford University, KinetX, Inc., Lockheed Martin Corporation, University of Colorado, the U.S. Department of Energy, and a number of other firms, NASA centers and university partners.

Press Briefing

Press Briefing 1 Press Briefing 2

Credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Representatives of NASA's New Horizons Mission to Pluto discuss the mission during a press briefing on the Draft Environmental Impact Statement at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. From left are Orlando Figueroa, deputy associate administrator for Programs, Science Mission Directorate; Earl Wahlquist, associate director for Space and Defense Power Systems, Department of Energy, in Germantown, Md.; Kurt Lindstrom, New Horizons program executive, with NASA; Hal Weaver, New Horizons project scientist, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md.; and Glen Fountain, New Horizons project manager, also with Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. The spacecraft will explore Pluto, its moon Charon, and possibly one or more objects within the Kuiper Belt. New Horizons is planned for launch during a window from Jan. 11 to Feb. 14, 2006, on an Atlas V 551 booster with a Star 48B third stage. It will proceed to a Jupiter gravity assist between Feb. 25 and March 2, 2007, if launched during the first 23 days of the launch window. (If it is launched during the last 12 days of the launch window it will have a direct-to-Pluto trajectory. There is a backup launch opportunity in February 2007.)